Flickr Upload: houdini

Better late than never, here is my Flickr posting from about three weeks ago. I saw this guy’s impressive vapor output when I was in town the other day. I’ve seen similar guys, but was somehow never able to come home with a shot that really illustrates the thickness and amount of vapor these e-cigarettes can generate. I had always imagined the shot to be like this one here where the guy would be partly hidden from view. It conveniently solves the problem of the right to a person’s image, which isn’t violated here the way it usually is in my photography. Neat! 😉

Flickr Upload: one.eye.and.a.lovesong

Here is a shot of a couple I managed to grab down by the river. Before spotting these two I had been taking several portraits of what I thought were interesting people always trying to incorporate the lines of the rails you see in this shot. My previous attempts weren’t as successful as I think this is. It appears that the girl’s making eye contact with the camera, thus capturing her attention for a split second away from the guy she’s with. I must say that this type of street portrait is very appealing to me ever since I saw a photo on Facebook in which a dad was carrying his son on his back. The photographer took a portrait of him in profile but the kid is looking straight into the camera all the while he’s resting his head against his dad’s neck. The eye contact is very intense while the contact between the two bodies was as well and I thought this  tension was where the picture’s power lay. I was hoping to achieve something like that here. I hope it’s at least somewhat successful.

Flickr Upload: pretty.girl.with.hat

This is a candid portrait I took on the Karneval weekend in Düsseldorf’s Königsallee. It was a quick drive-by snapshot but every now and then I get lucky with the timing and expression of a subject. A hat almost always helps of course as does natural beauty of the sort on display here…so…what’s important in a candid portrait like this? Number one is subject selection and number two is timing. Shutter speed isn’t super critical for a portrait on the street but, of course, people won’t keep still for you so anything below 1/60s I would say is pushing your luck unnecessarily. Anything 1/125s and above should be perfect. The light was still good here so I came away with 1/250s at f2.2 and ISO 200.